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Helping your parents stay out of the nursing home...

Your parents say they couldn’t bear to lose their independence. Their hearts are set on staying in their own home for the rest of their days. And you understand. It’s what you’d like for them too. But they’re not as young as they used to be. Not as strong and on top of things. And you can’t help wondering if their plan is really wise, or even feasible. So you worry. The question of what’s best for mom and/or dad is one that bedevils many children with aging parents, says Dr. David Reuben, chief of the geriatrics division in UCLA’s Department of Medicine. "One of the things older people want most is to stay in their own homes....

posted on: Feb 6, 2012 | author: Staff writer

Why Prevent Falls Among Seniors?

Falls, regardless of how minor the resulting injury, can give solid advance warning of something wrong. Falls can be like strokes in the degree of harm they can do to the patient. While some patients do recover from the injury, for many others it can lead to a host of physical and emotional problems, such as social isolation, depression, muscle atrophy, and pneumonia. Yet many older people avoid reporting falls or asking for help. They are afraid their families will consider them unable to take care of themselves and move them to nursing homes. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of adults aged 65 and older in the U.S. suffer...

Why Prevent Falls Among Seniors?
posted on: Nov 11, 2008 | author: Staff writer

How to Thrive in Senior Years

* Maintain a positive outlook* Keep your stress levels low* Do away with smoking* Do have a glass of wine every so often* Have no chronic health issues* Arrange to have a retirement income of at least $30,000 a year. It is a fairly simple formula. Unfortunately, the study finds, few people seem willing to stick to it. The study involved a tracking survey on the lifestyle and quality of life of 2,432 older Canadians over a period of 10 years. It was carried out by researchers at the Portland State University, Oregon Health and Science University, the Kaiser Permanent Center for Health Research, and Statistics Canada. The people whose health conditions were rated excellent over the entire...

How to Thrive in Senior Years
posted on: Nov 7, 2008 | author: Staff writer

Heart Failure Ups Risk for Hip Fracture...

Congestive heart failure, or simply heart failure, is a condition where the heart is not able to pump enough blood to other organs in the body. Fractures, particularly hip bone fractures, can prove fatal as they lead to higher risk of serious blood clots and lung infections. Nearly a third of patients die within a year of suffering a hip fracture. Those who survive experience significant loss of function and independence, and many of them require long-term care. The study, carried out by researchers at the University of Alberta, covered 16,294 patients, aged 68 to 84, who had been treated for heart disease at emergency rooms in Alberta. One year after their emergency room visit, 4.6 percent of...

Heart Failure Ups Risk for Hip Fracture
posted on: Oct 21, 2008 | author: Staff writer

Senior Browsers Get Their Brains Sharper...

The study, conducted by University of California Los Angeles researchers, analyzed the brain activity of middle-age and older adults during web browsing. It involved 24 adults, ages 55 to 78. No one among the participants had dementia or any other neurological conditions, and they all had similar educational levels. One half of the group searched the Internet at least once a day, while the other half used it only once a month or never. Brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans on two separate activities: while reading text (formatted to look like a book and displayed on a computer monitor) and while performing web searches. The researchers found that when both groups were reading...

Senior Browsers Get Their Brains Sharper
posted on: Oct 18, 2008 | author: Staff writer

Deficiencies Found In 90% Of Nursing Homes...

For-profit nursing homes — which comprise 67% of all 15,000 nursing homes nationwide — showed an average of 7.6 deficiencies per home and 94% of them received citations in 2007. In contrast, non-profit nursing homes and government homes — which account for 27% and 6%, respectively — generated averages of 5.7 deficiencies per non-profit home and 6.3 deficiencies per government home. Only 88% of non-profit nursing homes and 91% of government homes were cited for violations last year. * The most common citations involved quality of care deficiencies. This category includes deficiencies in the care and treatment administered on pressure sores and urinary tract infections. This also refers to lack of facilities to promote the mental and physical...

Deficiencies Found In 90% Of Nursing Homes
posted on: Sep 30, 2008 | author: Staff writer

Are Aged Drivers A Hazard?

Some people think seniors should no longer be driving because their slow reflexes make them a danger on the road. However, the most recent Utah crash statistics actually indicates that older drivers are the age group with the least probability of getting into any crash, including those that result in fatality, injury or property damage. Young drivers in their teens were found to have a crash rate five times higher than the rate for octogenarians. The Utah driver services bureau chief acknowledges there may be a problem with senior drivers, but not quite as big as people think. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says automobile crashes account for less than 1 percent of deaths among those 70...

Are Aged Drivers A Hazard?
posted on: Jun 16, 2008 | author: Staff writer

Seniors Suffering More Escalator Injuries...

Despite the increase, most injuries were minor and only 8 percent of injured seniors needed to be hospitalized after being evaluated in an emergency room. Nearly three of four injuries (over 73 percent) were on older women. Injuries to the legs or feet were the most common at 26 percent, along with head injuries at 25 percent. More than half (54 percent) were soft-tissue injuries, such as sprains, followed by minor cuts and abrasions (nearly 22 percent). There were a few fractures (16 percent). The team emphasized that escalator injuries constitute a very small portion of the total number of injuries affecting older Americans. The study results are of interest mainly to those concerned about public safety for...

Seniors Suffering More Escalator Injuries
posted on: Mar 25, 2008 | author: Safety Issues

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