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Heart Attacks And Drinking Warm Water

Courtesy of HealthCareReview.com: This is a very good article. Not only about the warm water after your meal, but about Heart Attacks. The Chinese and Japanese drink hot tea with their meals, not cold water, maybe it is time we adopt their drinking habit while eating. For those who like to drink cold water, this article is applicable to you. It is nice to have a cup of cold drink after a meal. However, the cold water will solidify the oily stuff that you have just consumed. It will slow down the digestion. Once this ’sludge’ reacts with the acid, it will break down and be absorbed by the intestine faster than the solid food. It will line...

Heart Attacks And Drinking Warm Water
posted on: Jan 4, 2015 | author: Safety Issues

Liberia village becomes a new Ebola epicenter...

Courtesy of AOL.com –  JENE-WONDE, Liberia (AP) – A schoolteacher brought his sick daughter from Liberia’s capital to this small town of 300 people. Soon he was dead along with his entire family, and they are now buried in the forest nearby along with an increasing number of residents. The community of Jene-Wonde in Grand Cape Mount County near the border with Sierra Leone has become a new epicenter for the deadly Ebola outbreak in Liberia, which is also hitting Sierra Leone and Guinea. Momo Sheriff, who lost his son to Ebola, said there is no health care in the community and leaders have no way to manage it. The tiny town already has lost 10 percent of...

Liberia village becomes a new Ebola epicenter
posted on: Nov 10, 2014 | author: Safety Issues

Ebola: What you need to know if you live in the U.S....

Ebola is a serious disease. It can often be deadly to humans. Because of this, many people are concerned about Ebola. However, if you live in the United States, it’s very unlikely that you will be infected with the disease. What is Ebola? Where does it come from? Ebola first appeared in 1976 in two outbreaks in Africa. Since then, there have been other outbreaks of Ebola in Africa.Ebola is a disease that is caused by a virus. The virus is believed to be spread to people by wild animals. In humans, Ebola can be spread from a person who has symptoms to another person. In 2014, a serious Ebola outbreak was detected in West Africa, causing thousands...

Ebola: What you need to know if you live in the U.S.
posted on: Oct 30, 2014 | author: Safety Issues

Questions & Answers on Ebola Transmission...

What are body fluids? Ebola has been detected in blood and many body fluids. Body fluids include saliva, mucus, vomit, feces, sweat, tears, breast milk, urine, and semen. Can Ebola spread by coughing? By sneezing? Unlike respiratory illnesses like measles or chickenpox, which can be transmitted by virus particles that remain suspended in the air after an infected person coughs or sneezes, Ebola is transmitted by direct contact with body fluids of a person who has symptoms of Ebola disease. Although coughing and sneezing are not common symptoms of Ebola, if a symptomatic patient with Ebola coughs or sneezes on someone, and saliva or mucus come into contact with that person’s eyes, nose or mouth, these fluids may...

Questions & Answers on Ebola Transmission
posted on: Oct 23, 2014 | author: Safety Issues

Speciality pharmacies in U.S. fail safety inspections...

The agency said its inspectors targeted 31 compounding pharmacies that produce sterile drugs, which must be prepared under highly sanitary conditions. The FDA said Thursday it issued inspection reports to all but one of the pharmacies citing unsanitary conditions and quality control problems, including: Rust and mold in supposedly sterile rooms. Inadequate ventilation. Employees wearing non-sterile lab coats. More...

posted on: Apr 13, 2013 | author: Staff writer

National Brain Injury Awareness Month

What has the Army done? The Army has invested over $530 million to improve access to care, quality of care, research, as well as screening and surveillance for Soldiers with TBI and provides a standardized, comprehensive program delivering a continuum of integrated care from point-of-injury to return to duty or transition from active duty. The desired end-state is to deliver responsive, reliable, and relevant TBI care that enhances Soldier and unit readiness, optimizes value, and transforms the care experience of our Soldiers and their families....

National Brain Injury Awareness Month
posted on: Mar 5, 2013 | author: Staff writer

Patient Safety: Bill Clinton urges healthcare stakeholders not to leave patients sicker and broke...

Former President Bill Clinton addressed an audience of healthcare industry stakeholders last night, asking them to help leave the system better than they found it through coordinated efforts to leverage technology and expertise in the interest of patient health. Clinton offered the closing remarks of the Patient Safety, Science & Technology Summit in Laguna Beach, Calif., addressing medical device industry executives, clinicians and other healthcare workers gathered to discuss ways medical device interoperability might help prevent the estimated 200,000 annual deaths attributed to medical errors in the U.S. alone....

posted on: Jan 22, 2013 | author: Staff writer

Hospitals Late Responding to Heart Cases...

The researchers studied the medical records of 6,789 patients at 369 hospitals who suffered cardiac arrests. The heart could have been revived with a defibrillator, which administers an electrical shock to stimulate the heart into pumping again. The American Heart Association recommends that in case of cardiac arrest, electrical shock should be applied within two minutes. As discovered in the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the consequences of delayed response were critical. When the shock was administered on time, 39.3 percent of patients survived and were eventually discharged from the hospital. But when it was delayed, only 22.2 percent of patients lived. The chances of delay were greater when: * the cardiac arrests occurred...

Hospitals Late Responding to Heart Cases
posted on: Oct 31, 2012 | author: Staff writer

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